Dr. Mikhail Kogan named top doctor in Washington, D.C.

Why Integrative Medicine?

It is the medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, uses evidence-based combination of traditional and complimentary, and focuses on the whole person.

908 New Hampshire Ave,
Suite 200 Washington DC

202-833-5055
info@gwcim.com

Mon – Fri
9:00am – 5:00pm

Homepage Featured Posts
July 9, 2024We invite everybody to one day online Mindfulness Retreat with MBSR instructors Nina Paul and Cynthia Powell. What: 4 hours of deep immersion into Mindfulness practices guided by expert instructors and shared with a supportive peer group. When: Saturday, August 24th 9am-1pm (ET) Where: online, in your quiet room.  After registration you will receive an email with the Zoom link. Cost: $40 Everybody is welcome!  Call us about special discount for GWCIM MBSR course alumni. Register for Mindfulness Retreat Benefits of Mindfulness Retreat: Manage stress and anxiety more effectively Reduce stress impact on your health and relationships Enhance focus and productivity Promote physical health and vitality Strengthen good life habits Foster a deeper connection with yourself and others Use elements of the renowned MBSR program led by MBSR qualified instructors Discount for our MBSR course alumnae (contact GWCIM) [...] Read more...
June 25, 2024GW CIM is offering an evidence-based Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy Program for Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance. This program was developed by Dr. Jennifer Rioux, who is an Ayurvedic Doctor and certified Yoga Therapist in practice since 1999. Dr. Rioux has entitled the program Spiritual Metabolism™ to encompass the mind-body-spirit orientation which are hallmarks of the Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy paradigms. All Ayurvedic therapies will be tailored to the individual with ongoing patient engagement to support implementation. Outcomes from a pilot study of Dr. Rioux’s protocol have been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. The Ayurvedic protocol, patient education and yoga therapy will be delivered via telehealth, making the program accessible to patients even internationally. Patients will have the option to participate in data collection at their discretion. Those who participate in data collection will receive a discount and data collection instruments are designed to increase adherence to the protocol, leading to potential added benefit. To learn more about the program, cost and to watch video go to our AWL Program page.  For any questions and registration contact Dr. Rioux at jrioux@gwcim.com [...] Read more...
April 1, 2024Spring is here! As the world around bursts into flowers and first green leaves, Chinese Medicine invites us to align our food and life routines with nature’s renewal. Nature awakens from its winter dormancy, and Chinese Medicine also focuses on invigorating the body and promoting healthy circulation during taking advantage of natural vibrant forces. Learn from traditional medicine how to use Qi and bold attitude of Spring in our Seasonal blog series! Spring time: Liver orders, Wood grows. In Chinese medicine, spring is associated with the element wood. This element embodies qualities like growth, new beginnings, and fresh energy. The wood element is closely linked to the liver, a vital organ according to Chinese Medicine. The liver is believed to play a key role in managing healthy metabolism: detoxification, circulation, and overall well-being, mirroring the themes of renewal and growth that characterize spring.  Liver has strong affinity to bitter and sour tastes in food. Upward Energy: Greens! Chinese Medicine views spring as a time of upward-moving energy, mirroring the growth of plants reaching for the sun. To tap into this energy, fill your plate with fresh, leafy greens and sprouts. Asparagus, kale, spinach, swiss chard, collard and dandelion greens are all fantastic choices. These vibrant veggies are not only delicious but also rich in chlorophyll, which Chinese Medicine believes helps cleanse and rejuvenate the liver, a key organ in spring.  For most of these greens slight cooking is still preferred way of including them into diet.  We will discuss cooking methods at the end of this article. Delicate greens and sprouts are great raw along with your cooked meal.  If your digestion is generally weak, continue relying on cooked vegetables and include only small amounts of raw greens. Sour Power: Spring Cleaning from the Inside Out Spring is also a time to help the body get rid of any stagnation after the richer foods and somewhat slower lifestyle of winter. Chinese Medicine recommends incorporating sour-flavored foods into your diet. Think tart fruits like grapefruit and kiwi, spices like ginger and lemon juice, fermented foods like kimchi and sauerkraut and natural apple and wine vinegars in the fresh salad dressings. These stimulate the digestive system and help eliminate any lingering winter sluggishness. Sweet on Spring: A Touch of Nourishment While sour flavors cleanse, a touch of sweetness can provide a gentle energy boost to support the dynamism spring.  Moderation is key! Go for naturally sweet fruits like dates and berries, touch of honey and maple syrup. These offer a gentle sweetness without overloading your system.  Sprouts can also contain healthy sugars along with vitamins and minerals. Sprouts and Shoots: New Beginnings Sprouts and shoots are the very expression of spring’s new growth and they are full of Qi. Chinese Medicine views a seed as “yin” (potential energy, associated with dormancy and winter) and a sprout as “yang” (active energy, associated with growth and spring). By consuming sprouts, you’re essentially ingesting the essence of yang energy at its peak. This aligns with the body’s natural shift towards outward movement and growth during spring. Sprouted mung beans, pea shoots, and sunflower sprouts add a delightful crunch and freshness to salads and stir-fries.  But any sprouted seed is a game in the spring!  It is easy to grow your own fresh sprouts. Cooking with the Seasons: Light and Lively Spring is not the time for heavy meals. Chinese Medicine suggests lighter cooking methods like steaming, stir-frying, sauteing and simmering. This allows the natural flavors of seasonal produce to shine, while nutrients to be preserved and, most importantly, easily assimilated by your body. Incorporate spring spices to highlight your meal: ginger, chives, green onions, cilantro, mint… Additionally, limit fried foods and processed ingredients that can dampen your body’s energy flow. What about lifestyle changes in the spring? Chinese medicine suggests following a natural change.  Get up earlier, spend more time outdoors, move more, enjoy sunlight, do gardening and spring cleaning, and take dogs for longer walks. While jumping in green pastures might be more suited to our sheep, cow, and goat friends (no worries, you can watch videos of them frolicking!), the idea is to embrace the season’s renewal. Recipe 1: Asparagus says hi to ginger, garlic and scallions Spring into deliciousness with this simple asparagus recipe!  Preheat your broiler to low. In a bowl, toss 1 pound trimmed asparagus with 1 tablespoon avocado oil, minced garlic, grated fresh ginger, soy sauce, and pepper. Arrange the asparagus on a parchment-lined baking sheet and broil for 5-7 minutes per side, or until slightly cooked but not charred. Enjoy hot, garnished with fresh chives. Recipe 2: Dandelions roar and eggs listen! Heat olive oil in a pan, sauté any type of onions and garlic until fragrant. Add roughly chopped dandelion greens (rinsed and with thick stems removed) and cook until well wilted. In a separate bowl, whisk eggs with milk (or water) and season. Push greens to one side of the pan, pour in the egg mixture, and scramble until set. Crumble feta cheese over the top, cook another minute for melting cheese, and enjoy your Scrambled Eggs with Dandelion Greens and Feta, garnished with sun dried tomatoes, olives and herbs! In conclusion: By embracing Chinese Medicine principles, you can create a spring diet that’s not just delicious but also supports your overall health and well-being.  Visit your farmers market, join CSA, stock up on fresh produce, grow your own sprouts and enjoy the invigorating energy of spring! Image credits: Vecteesy, Pixelbay. Angela Gabriel, MSOM, L.Ac, CH, SEP. Angela practices Chinese Medicine since 2005.  She is one of senior acupuncturists at the GW Center for Chinese Medicine.  She offers acupuncture and Somatic Experiencing sessions. [...] Read more...
January 30, 2024Our recent virtual Open House was dedicated to Mental Health and Trauma. We brought together all GCWIM doctors and practitioners involved in treating mental health and trauma conditions. The event featured several short presentations and Q&A session.  This YouTube video is 1 hour long. [...] Read more...

Our Team

We are truly integrated team of medical professionals.  Our weekly team meetings serve you as much as us in order to perfect our skills and lead you on your journey to optimal health and balanced life.

GW Center for Integrative Medicine

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Homepage Blog Posts
July 9, 2024We invite everybody to one day online Mindfulness Retreat with MBSR instructors Nina Paul and Cynthia Powell. What: 4 hours of deep immersion into Mindfulness practices guided by expert instructors and shared with a supportive peer group. When: Saturday, August 24th 9am-1pm (ET) Where: online, in your quiet room.  After registration you will receive an email with the Zoom link. Cost: $40 Everybody is welcome!  Call us about special discount for GWCIM MBSR course alumni. Register for Mindfulness Retreat Benefits of Mindfulness Retreat: Manage stress and anxiety more effectively Reduce stress impact on your health and relationships Enhance focus and productivity Promote physical health and vitality Strengthen good life habits Foster a deeper connection with yourself and others Use elements of the renowned MBSR program led by MBSR qualified instructors Discount for our MBSR course alumnae (contact GWCIM) [...] Read more...
June 25, 2024GW CIM is offering an evidence-based Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy Program for Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance. This program was developed by Dr. Jennifer Rioux, who is an Ayurvedic Doctor and certified Yoga Therapist in practice since 1999. Dr. Rioux has entitled the program Spiritual Metabolism™ to encompass the mind-body-spirit orientation which are hallmarks of the Ayurveda and Yoga Therapy paradigms. All Ayurvedic therapies will be tailored to the individual with ongoing patient engagement to support implementation. Outcomes from a pilot study of Dr. Rioux’s protocol have been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. The Ayurvedic protocol, patient education and yoga therapy will be delivered via telehealth, making the program accessible to patients even internationally. Patients will have the option to participate in data collection at their discretion. Those who participate in data collection will receive a discount and data collection instruments are designed to increase adherence to the protocol, leading to potential added benefit. To learn more about the program, cost and to watch video go to our AWL Program page.  For any questions and registration contact Dr. Rioux at jrioux@gwcim.com [...] Read more...
April 1, 2024Spring is here! As the world around bursts into flowers and first green leaves, Chinese Medicine invites us to align our food and life routines with nature’s renewal. Nature awakens from its winter dormancy, and Chinese Medicine also focuses on invigorating the body and promoting healthy circulation during taking advantage of natural vibrant forces. Learn from traditional medicine how to use Qi and bold attitude of Spring in our Seasonal blog series! Spring time: Liver orders, Wood grows. In Chinese medicine, spring is associated with the element wood. This element embodies qualities like growth, new beginnings, and fresh energy. The wood element is closely linked to the liver, a vital organ according to Chinese Medicine. The liver is believed to play a key role in managing healthy metabolism: detoxification, circulation, and overall well-being, mirroring the themes of renewal and growth that characterize spring.  Liver has strong affinity to bitter and sour tastes in food. Upward Energy: Greens! Chinese Medicine views spring as a time of upward-moving energy, mirroring the growth of plants reaching for the sun. To tap into this energy, fill your plate with fresh, leafy greens and sprouts. Asparagus, kale, spinach, swiss chard, collard and dandelion greens are all fantastic choices. These vibrant veggies are not only delicious but also rich in chlorophyll, which Chinese Medicine believes helps cleanse and rejuvenate the liver, a key organ in spring.  For most of these greens slight cooking is still preferred way of including them into diet.  We will discuss cooking methods at the end of this article. Delicate greens and sprouts are great raw along with your cooked meal.  If your digestion is generally weak, continue relying on cooked vegetables and include only small amounts of raw greens. Sour Power: Spring Cleaning from the Inside Out Spring is also a time to help the body get rid of any stagnation after the richer foods and somewhat slower lifestyle of winter. Chinese Medicine recommends incorporating sour-flavored foods into your diet. Think tart fruits like grapefruit and kiwi, spices like ginger and lemon juice, fermented foods like kimchi and sauerkraut and natural apple and wine vinegars in the fresh salad dressings. These stimulate the digestive system and help eliminate any lingering winter sluggishness. Sweet on Spring: A Touch of Nourishment While sour flavors cleanse, a touch of sweetness can provide a gentle energy boost to support the dynamism spring.  Moderation is key! Go for naturally sweet fruits like dates and berries, touch of honey and maple syrup. These offer a gentle sweetness without overloading your system.  Sprouts can also contain healthy sugars along with vitamins and minerals. Sprouts and Shoots: New Beginnings Sprouts and shoots are the very expression of spring’s new growth and they are full of Qi. Chinese Medicine views a seed as “yin” (potential energy, associated with dormancy and winter) and a sprout as “yang” (active energy, associated with growth and spring). By consuming sprouts, you’re essentially ingesting the essence of yang energy at its peak. This aligns with the body’s natural shift towards outward movement and growth during spring. Sprouted mung beans, pea shoots, and sunflower sprouts add a delightful crunch and freshness to salads and stir-fries.  But any sprouted seed is a game in the spring!  It is easy to grow your own fresh sprouts. Cooking with the Seasons: Light and Lively Spring is not the time for heavy meals. Chinese Medicine suggests lighter cooking methods like steaming, stir-frying, sauteing and simmering. This allows the natural flavors of seasonal produce to shine, while nutrients to be preserved and, most importantly, easily assimilated by your body. Incorporate spring spices to highlight your meal: ginger, chives, green onions, cilantro, mint… Additionally, limit fried foods and processed ingredients that can dampen your body’s energy flow. What about lifestyle changes in the spring? Chinese medicine suggests following a natural change.  Get up earlier, spend more time outdoors, move more, enjoy sunlight, do gardening and spring cleaning, and take dogs for longer walks. While jumping in green pastures might be more suited to our sheep, cow, and goat friends (no worries, you can watch videos of them frolicking!), the idea is to embrace the season’s renewal. Recipe 1: Asparagus says hi to ginger, garlic and scallions Spring into deliciousness with this simple asparagus recipe!  Preheat your broiler to low. In a bowl, toss 1 pound trimmed asparagus with 1 tablespoon avocado oil, minced garlic, grated fresh ginger, soy sauce, and pepper. Arrange the asparagus on a parchment-lined baking sheet and broil for 5-7 minutes per side, or until slightly cooked but not charred. Enjoy hot, garnished with fresh chives. Recipe 2: Dandelions roar and eggs listen! Heat olive oil in a pan, sauté any type of onions and garlic until fragrant. Add roughly chopped dandelion greens (rinsed and with thick stems removed) and cook until well wilted. In a separate bowl, whisk eggs with milk (or water) and season. Push greens to one side of the pan, pour in the egg mixture, and scramble until set. Crumble feta cheese over the top, cook another minute for melting cheese, and enjoy your Scrambled Eggs with Dandelion Greens and Feta, garnished with sun dried tomatoes, olives and herbs! In conclusion: By embracing Chinese Medicine principles, you can create a spring diet that’s not just delicious but also supports your overall health and well-being.  Visit your farmers market, join CSA, stock up on fresh produce, grow your own sprouts and enjoy the invigorating energy of spring! Image credits: Vecteesy, Pixelbay. Angela Gabriel, MSOM, L.Ac, CH, SEP. Angela practices Chinese Medicine since 2005.  She is one of senior acupuncturists at the GW Center for Chinese Medicine.  She offers acupuncture and Somatic Experiencing sessions. [...] Read more...
February 2, 2024Spend a half day tapping into the profound wisdom of cannabis as medicine to restore, reset, and walk away with new insights about your healing journey. You’ll have a chance to explore gentle movements with Yael Flusberg, integrative yoga therapist and resilience coach. And we’ll enjoy a Conscious Cannabis Circle facilitated by Shervon Laurice of Restore Tranquility which integrates guided meditation, music, and the potency of cannabis to help us grow, awaken and heal. A guest presenter Dr. MIkhail Kogan, Medical Director of the GW Center for Integrative Medicine and author of Medical Marijuana, will talk about the benefits of cannabis for trauma healing. March 2nd 1:30-7:30 pm in Silver Spring, MD $150/person registration which includes a free copy of Medical Marijuana book. Register online HERE [...] Read more...
January 30, 2024Our recent virtual Open House was dedicated to Mental Health and Trauma. We brought together all GCWIM doctors and practitioners involved in treating mental health and trauma conditions. The event featured several short presentations and Q&A session.  This YouTube video is 1 hour long. [...] Read more...
January 17, 2024Join us to our next Free Virtual Open House on Trauma and Mental Health.  It is a free education event offered to community by GWCIM medical team. Our leading specialists Dr. Mikhail Kogan, MD (GWCIM medical director), Dr. Misty Embrey, MD (psychiatry), Dr. Sally Novak (psychotherapy, Chinese Medicine), Angela Gabriel (Somatic Experiencing), Jennifer Rioux (Ayurveda), Nina Paul (MBSR) and Cynthia Powell (MBSR) will present Integrative Medicine approaches to Trauma and Mental Health.  There will be time for live Q&A.  Help us spread the word! Topic: GWCIM Mental Health and Trauma Virtual Open House Time: Feb 2, 2024 03:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada) Join Zoom Meeting https://gwu-edu.zoom.us/j/8812960654?omn=91400532210 Meeting ID: 881 296 0654 [...] Read more...
January 3, 2024Dr. Mikhail Kogan was named as one of Washington D.C.’s top doctors by The Washingtonian magazine. Dr. Kogan, author of a highly acclaimed book “Medical Marijuana: Dr. Kogan’s Evidence-Based Guide to the Health Benefits of Cannabis and CBD” also serves as as medical director of the GW Center for Integrative Medicine. Dr. Kogan provides innovative and effective treatments with minimal use of invasive procedures or heavy reliance on medications. He is especially dedicated to helping patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Kogan practices Geriatric and Integrative Medicine in a variety of settings: at the George Washington Hospital, at the GW Center for Integrative medicine, and serving patients via home visits. GW Center for Integrative Medicine is one of only 29 integrative medicine centers in the United States. GW Center effectively combines conventional and evidence-based complementary and alternative modalities and for 25 years has fostered close collaboration with the George Washington University Medical Center’s physicians in most subspecialties. About the Washingtonian Founded in 1965, Washingtonian is the areas top source on information for dining, shopping, entertainment, and personalities. It has been Washington, D.C.’s trusted guide for living, working, and playing for more than five decades. Annually they award top recognition to specialists in the Washington, D.C. area. More Information For more information about Dr. Kogan and his services, contact GW Center for Integrative Medicine. [...] Read more...

Reviews

GW Center for Integrative Medicine IconGW Center for Integrative Medicine

908 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest #200, Washington

4.7 46 reviews

  • Avatar Mandy A ★★★★★ 2 weeks ago
    Having a great experience with GW Center for Integrative medicine! Dr Sadrolsadots knowledge, direction, and guidance have been so helpful! Actually, all the staff have been so kind and helpful!=)
  • Avatar Shannon Boyle ★★★★★ 4 months ago
    My experience with the practitioners at GW Integrative Medicine has been fantastic. They are so knowledgable. With my natuorpathic doc I'd say Dr. Sadrolsadot knows his stuff and is really easy to work with. He really got to the … More point of the supplements I needed to maximize my health without adding unnecessary stuff. He is definitely practices with an evidence based approach. Dr. Orceyre is my acupuncurist and also has so much knowledge behind what she does. These docs are experienced and really know their stuff. I would highly recommend the center for anybody looking to optimize their health while going through a health challenge or right after.
  • Avatar Tiffany C. Hoyt ★★★★★ 4 months ago
    Working with Dr. Rioux has brought me to whole new levels of clarity about my health and health practices. She explains difficult concepts in a few brief sentences and when something doesn't work has so many tools at her disposal that … More she can easily pivot and offer an alternative. She's totally unique in our small corner of integrated health: merging traditional wisdom with a completely fresh way of implementing it.